Apr
27
Common embarrassing Spanish mistakes.
Filed under (Uncategorized) by marcus @ 01:09 am
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One of the most common Spanish expressions is me gusta. You’ll use it everyday. Ten cuidado (be careful) though because it does have a red-faced-booby-trap.

One time I was left blushing when I said, “no me gusta Alejandro Fernández pero me gusta Vicente Fernández.”

I thought it was an innocent enough comment about liking father Vicente’s music but not his son Alejandro’s music.

The amigo I was with, Jose Luis, es bromista, (is a joker) he immediately saw the other meaning and there was no way he’d let me get away with that.

He raised an eyebrow and said, “te GUSTA Vicente Fernández EH!”

Now you probably know, me gusta, as, I like.

You could say, me gusta la comida Española.

Perfecto, no hay problema, they will understand that you like Spanish food.

And if you were to say,

Me gusta vivir en México

Again no hay problema, they’ll hear that you like to live in Mexico.

Here’s where I came unstuck. Me gusta can literally mean, to me it is pleasing,

So when I said, me gusta Vicente Fernández, I was saying, to me Vicente Fernandez Is pleasing. In other words, I fancy him.

I like his music. I like his manner. I have fond memories of when I went to his concert in a bullring just a few feet away from the US border in Playas de Tijuana, but I don’t fancy him.

En cambio. (On the other hand.)

A muchas mujeres mexicanas si les gusta Vicente Fernández
Many Mexican women do fancy Vicente Fernandez,

Vicente is in his 70s now, yet at the show young girls were lining up to give him a rose and a hug. It was like an Elvis concert.

I remember one woman at the concert waved a rose madly for at least 15 minutes but just couldn’t get his attention.

She got my attention right away. I couldn’t help notice her, she was muy voluptuosa.

When she finally caught “ol” Chente’s eye, he came over to accept the rose. Then she grabbed him and gave him a huge kiss.

That mamacita put a gleam in Chente’s eye that I could see shine all the way up to where I was sitting.

Regresando al tema (getting back to the topic).

Here’s what to say when you like someone but don’t fancy them.

Me cae bien Vicente Fernández.
I like Vicente Fernandez.

Me cae bien is a very common way to say you like someone. It’s perfectly understood; it’s used all over the Spanish-speaking world and it will keep you safe from Jose Luis’s eyebrows.

En conclusión.

Sí, me cae bien Chente.
Yes, I like Chente.

Me gusta escuchar su música.
I like to listen to his music.

Me gusta como canta.
I like how he sings.

Y me gusta la chica que le dio un beso a Vicente en el concierto.
And I fancy the girl who gave a kiss to Vicente in the concert.

Solo estoy bromeando (I’m just joking)

It’s great to add common expressions like me cae bien to your Spanish repertoire and know the deeper meaning of everyday phrases like me gusta.

Many Spanish words have additional meanings just like English words do. These secondary meanings are so common that Spanish Ear Training Master Classes #2, #3, and #4 are dedicated to that very tema (topic).

www.spanisheartraining.com


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Mar
08
Mexican men should be ugly she said
Filed under (Spanish Ear Training) by marcus @ 12:57 am
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Serenades still sometimes happen in Mexico.

We got woken up one night by una serenata under la ventana de nuestra vecina (our neighbor’s window).

My wife thought it was so romantic. A real life vision from the time of sus abuelos (her grandparents).

The girl didn’t seem pleased though. She just stayed inside. She didn’t even show her face in the window. Elena said, “she must be angry with him”.

I guess it was a make-up-for-some-bad-behavior-serenade.

Eventually, our neighbor could resist no more. She came to the window and later opened the door….

The morning music I used to hear was very different to the romantic serenades.

Our apartment backed onto a car wash. The workers in the car wash played Mexican Banda and Norteña music all day long.

And they started early.

If you haven’t heard Mexican Norteña music it might sound offensive to your ears.

The culture of this music in the village dance halls is that anyone can have a go. However, just because someone has the gumption to try singing doesn’t mean they sing well.

In fact, most sing terribly,

Yet, after hearing the songs over and over I started to get used to the sound.

One song in particular “Profundamente” by “El Coyote y Su Banda” grew on me. I really started to like it. I still like it.

Back then I was teaching English to a group of nurses, a tough job but someone had to do it.

I remember one of the girls telling me she didn’t like handsome men like Brad Pitt. According to her, men should be fuerte, fornido y feo. (Strong, hefty and ugly.)

She would probably like El Coyote.

Music is a really good fun way to pick up words.

El Coyote’s nasal voice is a little difficult to understand at times. That’s why I have added a transcript and some hints to help you understand more of El Coyote’s Spanish.

Profundamente transcript

If you find Spanish speakers hard to understand in general, check out Spanish Ear Training. It’s a program especially designed to tune up your ear for understanding fast paced spoken Spanish.

Note: Spanish Ear Training is not a program for beginners. To get the most from the Ear Training, you need a strong foundation in Spanish. If you’d like to know about my path to get you speaking Spanish, click here.





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Oct
11
Rant in Spanish like a millionaire
Filed under (Spanish Ear Training) by marcus @ 06:42 am
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One of the best and highest paid soccer players in the world is Cristiano Ronaldo from Portugal.

Recently he was complaining that opposition players always hack him down with fouls. According to Ronaldo he gets no protection from the referees while other players are carefully watch after.

Then he added, “por ser rico por ser guapo por ser un gran jugador las personas tienen envidia de mi. No tiene otra explicación”

TRANSLATION.

“For being rich, for being handsome, for being a great player the people are jealous of me. It has no other explanation.”

Well, he’s definitely a great player. And he’s rich, last year Real Madrid paid him more than one million Euros per month. (USD$1.35 million)

Is he really as handsome as he thinks? Judge for yourself here:

Let me know what you think of el galán (the handsome young man).

Click here for a Transcript and Translation of What Ronaldo said.

If you found Ronaldo hard to understand, no te preocupes, don’t be worried. He does have a strong Portuguese accent. Plus he’s definitely in a grumbling mood and as a consequence mumbling his words.

If you find all Spanish speakers hard to understand, check out Spanish Ear Training. It’s a program especially designed to tune up your ear for understanding fast paced spoken Spanish.

Note: Spanish Ear Training is not a program for beginners. To get the most from the ear training, you need a strong foundation in Spanish. If you’d like to know about my path to get you speaking Spanish, click here.










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Mar
24
Common Spanish Expressions
Filed under (General) by marcus @ 12:57 am
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Here’s a dictionary of some of the most deceptive expressions in Spanish.
It’s an extension of the original Spanish Beyond the Dictionary,
dictionary.

It’s a dictionary of Spanish words and expressions I call Comprehension Killers.

Their meanings are deceptive. They can trick you. And that makes it hard when you’re trying to keep up with a Spanish conversation.

If you miss their meaning you have to play catch up in the conversation, which isn’t easy if Spanish is flying by fast.

I’ve been collecting these expressions for a while now. I started doing it to help me understand the Spanish I was hearing around me.

I always made a point of distinguishing between once in a blue moon expressions and the frequently used ones.

The ones in this dictionary are common. Yet, you can easily miss them. That is until I point them out to you. Then, you’ll start hearing them all over the place.

You’ll hear them on the streets, in the bars and cafes and all the time when Spanish speakers chat among themselves…

Yet, they are often left out of regular dictionaries and textbooks.

That’s why this tool is a handy addition to your repertoire. It’ll help you understand more of what people say to you.

It’s yours gratis on the link below.

Click here to Get Spanish Beyond the Dictionary Volume Two

If you missed the original Spanish Beyond The Dictionary, mini dictionary
It’s still available on this page:

Click here to Get Spanish Beyond the Dictionary Volume One

Remember these expressions are often invisible until someone points them out. Enjoy them, and have fun noticing how often they show up. They’ll help you understand more clearly what people say to you.

Saludos

Marcus Santamaria


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